Water free cosmetics, is it worth it? | Gencix

Water free cosmetics, is it worth it?

A new trend. Shampoo, deodorant, toothpaste ... In recent years, solid cosmetics have started to tackle mainstream markets and attract more and more consumers. Here’s why:

With the rise of solid cosmetics, soaps replace liquid products and plastic containers.

Their particularity: they are almost always water free. "Soap is a common solid cosmetic, so it's not new. But we have seen other products emerge in recent years: shampoo, toothpaste, deodorant .... " says Laurence Wittner, Director of the Cosmetics Observatory and Editor-in-Chief of CosmeticsOBS.

A diversified offer

Popularized by committed brands, such as Lush, Pachamamai, Lamazuna and sometimes more local ones such as La Savonnerie Aubergine, Les savons de Joya and Ma Kibell, these products, which often come without packaging and preservatives, are no longer the prerogative of specialized shops. "It's part of the minimalist, green and responsible trend" says Laurence Wittner. “A liquid shampoo contains 90% of water. Therefore, with solid cosmetics, we save water and money while saving on transportation’s space because solid cosmetics are more compact”.

Other advantages : With solid cosmetics, no worries when flying. And they are long lasting as well as sustainable. "As water favors bacteria, traditional manufacturers use preservatives. Solid cosmetics contain fewer ingredients and are less likely to cause allergies, even if some risks remain” says Laurence Wittner.

And in fact, solid cosmetics are still mainly basic hygiene products. We do not find, or at least not yet, technical things such as an anti-aging wrinkle cream for example. Nonetheless, the offer is growing fast.

There are shaving balms, conditioners, make-up removers, powder body scrubs and even face and body masks in stick or made from fabric impregnated with the moisturizing substance.

Economical and convenient

And our pleasure then? "In cosmetics, there is a great deal of pleasure involved in the desire to buy a product and use it", confirms Laurence Wittner. "It's up to the manufacturer to recreate sensations close to liquid products," says Séverine Pallu, manager of Ma Kibell, created four years ago. "We have one solid toothpaste that sells well because the texture and the freshness obtained with essential oils are quite close to what we know. As for the quantity-price ratio, solid cosmetics are advantageous" adds Séverine Pallu: "A piece of 130g shampoo costs €10.50 and represents six months of use".

source:
Journal Dimanche Ouest France
by Charlotte Hervot
12 May 2019